• Alain Kuhn Von Kuhnenfeld

2021 Cadillac CT4-V

This week we are reviewing the 2021 Cadillac CT4-V. Our vehicle was assembled at the Lansing Grand River plant in the USA and has an MSRP of $57,380.00 CAD.


Cadillac CT4-V
Photo by Luis G Manrique

Fun Factor: 8

Can it Family: 6

Fuel-Friendly: 6

HWY-warrior: 8

Karaoke-Friendly: 7

Baby-Friendly: 5

City Cruising: 7

Cadillac CT4-V
Photo by David Benazera

GM led us on a virtual tour of their winter testing facility in Kapuskasing, Ontario. The city is a synonym of long and cold winters. For over 48 years, GM has been testing vehicles here to ensure they can withstand the harshest conditions, for example, that your infotainment continues to work correctly or that your engine continues to run smoothly when it's -35c. Recently they have also been testing electric vehicles such as the Cadillac Lyriq and the awaited Hummer EV. It gives them an edge over indoor facilities that might not represent the ever-changing conditions Mother Nature throws at vehicles.


Cadillac CT4-V interior

Weather conditions weren't as severe as those in Kapuskasing when we tested the Cadillac CT4-V; however, -33c was so cold it froze any water droplets left after leaving the carwash. It is quite impressive that today's cars can withstand these temperatures and function normally without worrying about affecting performances.

Cadillac CT4-V
Photo by David Benazera

The exterior cues of the CT4-V give it an impressive road presence hence easily mistaken for a much bigger vehicle. Once you know it shares the same platform as the Chevrolet Camaro, you recognize the performance infusions and the likeness in size. The low seating position gives you a connected feeling, and when driving away with its 2.7L turbocharged inline-4 banger, you'll get head-turning power. Having driven its German rivals the M235GC, CLA 35 and the S3, we'd say something was still missing to make it exciting. My daughter jokingly asked what that "V" button does; when pressed, the engine releases its full potential: 325 hp and 380 lb-ft of torque, coupled to a 10-speed automatic. The power delivered is so linear it's hard to tell that under the hood is only a 4-cylinder. The magic mainly comes from the turbo with a dual volute turbine, an electronic boost control giving it better performance than an engine with a twin-scroll turbo setup. Cadillac announces a 0-100km/h time in just 5 seconds; in our real-life test during a snowstorm, we hit this in a mere 7 seconds, quite the achievement for a vehicle so low to the ground. Handling and suspension tuning are surprisingly good. The only fault we could see is its turning radius; it's less pleasant to drive it in tight and narrow streets.


Photo by David Benazera

Getting into the vehicle, you will notice right away that the interior is compact, reminiscent of a sports car. As a result, taller adults will take away rear passenger space. The same is true for the co-pilot who cannot be too tall either. The choice of materials let it stand out from the competition, from the buttons controlling the infotainment to the stitching on the dashboard, all give a luxurious feel. Seats provide a lot of support and are comfortable on long rides. The vehicle's focus on the driver results in a concession of space available for rear passengers. The same applies to the trunk, which is not easily accessible; the high lip makes larger items more challenging to place in, such as a stroller. Another drawback of this setup is the lack of a ski hatch, requiring you to fold down the rear seats if you want to take them along. The interior for a solo drive is perfect, to fit the family, not so much.

Cadillac CT4-V rear seats
Photo by David Benazera

We observed an average fuel economy of 10.8L/100km during our test, with temperatures oscillating between -3 and -33c. On the Hwy, we observed a reasonable 8.3L/100km, especially for an AWD car and, in the city, 12.1L/100km. Cadillac announces a combined average of 10.2L/100km, 8.4L/100 on the Hwy and 11.7L/100km.


Cadillac CT4-V interior
Photo by David Benazera

As a Hwy cruiser, the Cadillac CT4-V checks quite a few boxes: a decent fuel economy, enjoyable seating. Visibility is okay; the C pillar and the rear window do not provide much visibility.


Photo by David Benazera

The infotainment of the CT4-V is very user-friendly. The same goes for the climate controls with physical buttons; as we mentioned above, they feel very sturdy. In addition to wireless charging, you get Apple Car Play wirelessly and Android Auto giving you a real cord-free experience. The Bose system offered a rich enough experience to be up to Cadillac standards.


Photo by David Benazera

The car seat installation is effortless as the ISOFIX ports are hidden underneath flip-up covers. If the passenger in front is not too tall, a child can sit comfortably. We were able to fit an infant seat; then, the front passenger will have little legroom. The drawbacks start to appear when a taller passenger sits in front, making them uncomfortable or removing legroom for children in the back. Ideally, you should install the car seat behind a driver that is less than 5ft10. When it comes to booster seats, the bench's bolstering makes the fit uncomfortable, and the belt buckles are positioned in a tight fit, making it hard for children to buckle themselves. The door handles are easy to open and give a child the independence to open and close the doors by themselves.


Photo by David Benazera

In the city, touring mode is the best mode to drive the CT4-V; it provides a pleasant ride and lightens the steering wheel for a more relaxed experience. With the vehicle so low, you would imagine it would hamper comfort around potholes or road imperfection, yet; the ride is enjoyable. We found it more difficult navigating around tight parking spots or even U-turn as the turning radius is quite wide for a vehicle its size.


Why would we buy the Cadillac CT4-V, or what we liked about it? Interesting price for luxury and the vehicle's performances, especially when compared to its competitors. With the limited amount of domestic & import luxury sedans, the Cadillac stands on its own when it comes to real driving enjoyment.

Photo by David Benazera

Why would we not buy the Cadillac CT4-V, or what we did not like about it? Limited space for taller adults; trunk lip has an awkward shape making it unnecessarily harder to pack a stroller. While it looks more spacious than its competitors, the interior does not make you feel this way. If performance is not first on your list, the base model provides decent performances and becomes a more compelling proposition. If the CT4 & CT4-V aren't powerful enough, Cadillac will have the Blackwing with a 3.6L Twin-turbocharged V6 available with a manual transmission.

Photo by David Benazera

Cadillac has lent us this vehicle one week as a press vehicle. We have no affiliation with Cadillac Canada. The above is a recollection of our personal opinion of the car referred above. Photos by David Benazera

#cadillac #cadillacct4v #ct4v #cadillaccanada #luxury

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